Tag Archives: libraries

You Guessed It! More Librarians in Songs

Librarians just seem to be popular in all forms of popular culture, so another list.

Nick Cave! There She Goes My Beautiful World  is not really about libraries or librarians…but it is literary! I just really wanted to include Nick Cave. Could you blame me? 

Swinging London by Magnetic Fields is another stretch with one mention of a library. Why not, I ask you!?

Green Day’s At the Library does not have a happy ending; boy does not get girl. I’m assuming the song takes place in a library but other than the title, there is no other mention of libraries. 

Shouting in the Library by Popple…love it! A few lines in there most librarians can relate to.

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart sing about lust in the library in Young Adult Friction. Apparently libraries are great locations for sex (not!). 

Hilarious video by MC Poindexter and the Study Crew rapping out the Library Rap. Rife with stereotypes again…sigh…this song was taken from an episode from the 1990’s series, Sliders. 

Sweet Librarian by Railroad Jerk is a fun song if you can find it. I wasn’t able to include this song to listen to but if you’re interested, you can listen to a sample of it in iTunes. It’s an odd hillbilly song about someone crushing on a librarian. The lyrics are below:

Swee-eeeet librarian
What good books can you recommend?
Swee-eeeet librarian
Do you think that we could still be friends?

After everything that we’ve been through
Your books on time and mine overdue
I can’t help it if I have a cough
What days do you have off?

Swee-eeeet librarian
Four more days until the weekend
I-hiiiigh have been
Thinkin that we could still be friends

Is this reference or a circulating?
Would you like to go rollerblading?
I can’t help it if I have a cough
What days do you have off?

Sweeeeeet librarian
Sweeeeeet librarian
Sweeeeeet librarian
What good books can yooouuuu recommend?

Melvil Dewey is a children’s rap artist and has a CD called Deweylicious: Library Hip Hop…eeep! I don’t have a sample of this either so if you’re curious, you can listen to samples through iTunes (again). It includes such enticing titles as Dewey Decimal Rap and Evil Librarian. Listen at your own risk!

That’s it! Again, I ask if you enjoy these posts, comments go a long way for me to feel inspired to continue with this blog. Am I shamelessly begging? You bet!!!

Beautiful Libraries of Europe: Part III and Done!

Part III is the final post in the European Libraries series. Although, as I said in Part I, there are many, many more!

The Rijksmuseum Research Library is the largest public art history research library in the Netherlands and has been around since 1885.

Salle de lecture de la Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève (Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons - CC-BY-2.0-fr)

Salle de Lecture Bibliotheque Sainte-Genevieve is located in Paris. This library inherited the writings and collections of one of the largest and oldest abbeys in Paris and was founded in the sixth century. An interesting fact, the names of 810 scholars are inscribed on the exterior of the library. The second picture (click on it for a larger picture), highlights the inscriptions.

The Strahov Monastery Library is located in Prague and is part of a monastery built in 1143. A fresco adorns the ceiling painted in 1794 and the library contains ancient printing presses found downstairs.

This is the National Library of Finland located in Helsinki. It is the oldest and largest scholarly library in Finland.

This is the end! I will be happy to do more in the series if there’s a really large clamour for it! :)

Beautiful Libraries in Europe: Part II

On to Part II!

Here is Herzog August Bibliothek, located in  Wolfenbüttel Germany and established in 1572. In 1666, it was one of the most famous baronial book collections and the collection of medieval manuscripts was one of the most important collections in Europe.

This next library is the El Escorial Library located in  San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain built in 1584. It contains approximately 5000 manuscripts, many of which are illuminated. Look at that ceiling!

The next is the National Library of St Mark’s or Biblioteca Marciana, located in Venice Italy. Built between 1537-1588, it houses at least a million books and 13000 manuscripts (and includes original scores of operas by Cavalli and Scarlatti). Just for fun, if you click on the second picture, it will take you to a Youtube video of a couple dancing the tango in that very room.

Lastly, there is the National Library of France, or La Bibliothèque nationale de France, located in Paris. It originated as a part of the private Royal Library at The Louvre in 1368. It currently has 30 million items housed in its walls.

Part 3 wil be the final post on the European Library series. Thanks for reading it so far!

The Grey Lady of Willard Library

Just in time for Halloween, I thought I would write about haunted libraries. But, quoting Ministry, “everyday is Halloween” for me so these posts will definitely be coming long after the spooky holiday and well into the “nice” ones!

Willard Library (seen in the photo on the left) is located in Evansville, Indiana and has been around since 1885.

Plenty of time to gain a ghost!

There have been numerous sightings since 1930 of The Grey Lady…typically in the Children’s Room.

The best part is, they have a Ghost Cam! If you click on the still shot of the cam below, it will take you to the real thing.

So, if you’re ever in the neighbourhood while in Evansville, check out the library…you never know what you might find! A book or…a ghost!

I’m Baaack! Maybe…

What can I say. I’m a bad blogger! It’s been quite a long time since I posted. I blame it partly on getting a job (which keeps me busy) and partly on laziness. Okay, mostly it’s laziness! I’ve been thinking about what I could post on…I started this blog with a theme of libraries and librarians. So, perhaps to continue in that vein, I will combine two of my loves…the supernatural and libraries! Maybe it will be books and also haunted libraries…what fun! Hopefully I will stick to this so keep your eyes peeled for my first post on the subject. Coming to a blog near you!

More Beautiful Libraries (This Time We’ll Do the U.K.)

The second part involves libraries from Wales, England, Scotland, and Ireland

The first one is the Long Room from the The Library of Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland. I saw this library last summer and it knocked my socks off! The photo just does not do it justice! It’s the largest research library in Ireland and its biggest draw is the famous Book of Kells, which is well worth seeing if you make it there!

The Book of Kells, created by Monks in 800

The National Library of Ireland is also found in Dublin and is a reference library (i.e. no borrowing privileges)

The Theology Room at St. Deiniol’s library in Wales is seen below and is considered the largest residential library in the U.K. It has over 250,000 books.

The Glasgow School of Art has the Charles Rennie Macintosh Library in Scotland. Wish I’d seen it while I was there but only had time for a tattoo…ah me, priorities…anyway, the library carries the name of Charles Rennie Macintosh as he was the architect of the school and library. He’s famous for his art nouveau style in art and furniture design.

The Signet Library in Edinburgh, Scotland was visited by King George IV who described the upper library as “the finest drawing room in Europe”.

This is the Duke of Humphrey’s Library at Oxford University in England. It’s the main research library of the University of Oxford and is one of the oldest libraries in Europe (established in 1602, making it 408 years old!).

The Hereford Cathedral Chained Library is an interesting one! The practice of chaining books was the normal practice for reference libraries starting in the Middle Ages until the 18th century. The Chained Library has been around since the 1100’s (making it close to a 1000 years old!).

Next is the John Rylands Library in Manchester, England. It’s a Victorian Gothic building and holds many illuminated manuscripts including a copy of the Gutenberg Bible.

Lastly, we have the Old British Reading Room in the British Museum, London, England. The British Museum is the oldest museum in the world (1753) and features the Rosetta Stone. The Reading Room only opened to the general public for the first time in 2000. The Reading Room sits at the heart of the Great Court and has been used by the likes of Karl Marx, Rudyard Kipling, Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, Thomas Hardy, George Bernard Shaw, and Mahatma Gandhi.

That’s it for this part…next is Europe. That one will take me while!

Thanks again for reading. Please let me know if you’re enjoying this blog or if you know of other libraries you should like me to add!

Beautiful Libraries (or, I Wish I Worked There!)

I seem to really like making lists…so here’s another one! I thought I would pull together photos of some of the beautiful libraries in North America.

The Library of Parliament in Ottawa, Ontario looks gorgeous! I shall have to get there some day! Its picture is on our $10 bill…

This picture was taken the day after a fire burnt down the building next the the library which was untouched in 1916.

The Thomas Fisher Rare Books Library at the University of Toronto has an ugly exterior but is beautiful inside. I was lucky enough to take a class right in the middle of this library and was surrounded by these beautiful, rare books every week! It contains some Egyptian papyrus manuscript fragments from 245 B.C. as well as Darwin’s proof copy with annotations of On the Origin of  Species (both of which I had a chance to see).

The next are from the U.S. This first one is, of course, the Library of Congress in Washington. It’s the largest library in the world with 22 million catalogued books!

Here we have the Library of the Boston Anthenaeum. It was established in 1807,making it just over 200 years old!

Next is the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, which has the world’s largest collection of Shakespeare’s printed works. Funny, you’d think you’d find that in England!

This is the Law Library…in Iowa! I love the spiral staircase! It’s apparently five stories.

Here is the New York City Public Library. It’s one of the largest public library systems in the U.S. and the one of the largest research libraries in the world. It’s been featured in many movies, such as Spider-Man, The Wiz, and of course, Ghostbusters.

This is the Morgan Library & Museum in New York. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1966 and contains everything from Leonardo Da Vinci prints/drawings to Bob Dylan’s notes of Blowin’ in the Wind.

And lastly, the Suzzallo Library is a part of the University of Washington libraries in Seattle. I probably like it as it was built in the Gothic style…

These are just a few of the libraries in North America…I could do this all day! But, that would be boring. I will put up a few more posts on this topic…next will be the libraries in the UK and then in Europe (which in itself will probably need to be a two-parter!).

These libraries have made me realise that I need to travel more! Nothing can make me happier than seeing these libraries in person (okay, maybe that’s an exaggeration…eating a hot fudge sundae would make me pretty happy!)

Librarians in Song (And You Thought I Was Done!)

Yes, I have more! There have been a number of songs written for librarians so here we go again…

The first song on my list is Librarian by My Morning Jacket. I’ve never heard this song before but I rather like it (of course my favourite lyric is “take off those glasses and let down your hair for me”…yeesh!)

This one is by New Zealand band, Haunted Love, called…you guessed it…Librarian

Karen by the Go-Betweens is about someone looking for “affection” and he “don’t want no hoochie-coochie-mama” and then goes on to say he wants “a tiger on bended knees”?!?!? What!?!?!

Jonathan Rundman wrote Librarian and it is a free download if you’re interested. It comes from his album entitled Public Library. He really must be a fan of libraries!  Anyway, click on the link just below here and have a listen.

Librarian by Jonathan Rundman

This next one is interesting (I thought). It’s called I Love My Library by Lunch Money who are an Indie rock band aimed at kids/families. Not a bad little ditty, actually. Have a listen:

I Love My Library by Lunch Money

I love this next one! Library by Cursor Miner, who is Robert Tubb from England. According to Uncut, his music is “electro Syd Barrett meets Aphex Twin meets Gary Numan with a touch of early Eno and a nod at Beck”. How can you not love this!?!

Tori Amos compiled her best songs into Tales of a Librarian. The concept was that a librarian is a “chronicler” and she also put together the collection within the confines of the Dewey Decimal Classification System. Beyond all that, there aren’t any songs about librarians on the album.

The Librarian’s are a band (that no longer exists) from California. They’re labelled a “power pop band” and were apparently not very librarian-like with a raucous stage performance. An interesting fact, one of the band members, Ryan Gan, got his MLIS and is now an actual librarian in California.

If that weren’t enough…there’s a band from West Virginia called Librarians. They call their music Indie…

There are more songs of course but I think I’ll stop there…

Thanks for reading, and watching, and listening :)

Addendum

Pam mentioned in the comments about how the video for Head Over Heels by Tears for Fears takes place in the library. So, being an 80’s fan, I thought I would add the video…enjoy!